Dropper Loop

A step-by-step guide to tying a dropper loop.

How to Tie a Dropper Loop

Step 1: Form a loop anywhere in a line. 

Step 2: Round the loop on the standing line 4 to 5 times, keeping the initial loop open and centered.

Step 3:  Pass the working loop through the opening in the center of the rounds. 

Step 4: Tug the standing line in both directions to tighten. 

About the Drooper Loop

The dropper loop creates a loop anywhere in the line, at 90° to the line. It’s used by fishermen to set lines with multiple hooks. The dropper loop doesn’t compromise the strength of the line, and you can add as many to a rope as you want. They’re ideal for making a loop to loop connection along a line, which is faster and more secure than tying individual knots.

Related Knots

Kreh loop: a non-slip loop at the end of a line for flexible attachment to lures. 

Surgeon’s end loop: a fast and strong knot made with two overhand knots in a doubled line.

Australian plait: a Bimini twist alternative for loop to loop connections. 

Nonslip loop knot: a more common name for the Kreh loop. 

Rapala knot: a way to attach lures to monofilament, popularized by Rapala lures.

When to Use a Dropper Loop

The dropper loop knot puts stable loops at right angles into the middle of a line. Once you get the hang of tying the knot, they’re fast to execute. When building a shelter, you can use dropper loops for making a loop to loop connection with other lines. It’s a simple, fast, and secure way of joining lines. Plus, you’re able to place those lines under substantial tension for a more stable structure. For fast toeholds and grips in a rope, you can also add a few dropper loops, making it much easier to climb or rappel steep areas. 

It’s also easy to dismantle loop to loop connections, even if the knots themselves aren’t easy to untie. By removing tension on the line and threading it back through the loop, you can dismantle a shelter or disconnect two lines fast. 

For Survival

The dropper loop knot puts stable loops at right angles into the middle of a line. Once you get the hang of tying the knot, they’re fast to execute. When building a shelter, you can use dropper loops for making a loop to loop connection with other lines. It’s a simple, fast, and secure way of joining lines. Plus, you’re able to place those lines under substantial tension for a more stable structure. For fast toeholds and grips in a rope, you can also add a few dropper loops, making it much easier to climb or rappel steep areas. 

It’s also easy to dismantle loop to loop connections, even if the knots themselves aren’t easy to untie. By removing tension on the line and threading it back through the loop, you can dismantle a shelter or disconnect two lines fast. 

While Camping

The dropper loop is primarily a fishing knot, used for dropping multi-hook lines in the water. Around the campsite, you can use a paracord with dropper loops for hanging lights, gear, and clothing. A cord with dropper loops is a fast and handy alternative to putting things on the ground while camping. Because you can place a dropper loop at any point in the line, they’re also a fast way to make adjustments to your campsite and shelter.

With Other Knots

You can use dropper loop knots to make a loop to loop connection, one of the most reliable ways of joining lines together. Using perfection loops with dropper loops, you create quick links that aren’t likely to fail. Or, after tying a dropper loop, cut the loop into two equal sections and use single strands for attaching hooks or sinkers. 

Around the House

Because the dropper loop knot is uniform and ties at a right angle to the standing line, with the right rope, they can be decorative both in the home and the yard. For landscaping, a secure cord with a series of dropper loop knots is perfect for hanging pots, or training wall climbing vines. Indoors, use natural fiber with dropper loop knots for displaying air plants or training indoor vines. Hanging seasonal decorations is also a lot easier with dropper knots secured from two points, rather than individually hanging stockings and decor.